2015 Year-End Reading Wrap-Up

Number of books read in 2015: 197

Picture books: 84 (actual number is higher but I didn’t add them all to LibraryThing)

Partially-read books: 16

Books read in 2015 minus picture books and partially-read books: 97

YA books read: 45

Average number of books read per month (including YA, excluding picture books and partially-read books): 8.08

Audiobooks: 14

Total page count: 51,949 (This is approximate rather than exact. I used data from LT without filtering out audiobooks, picture books, or partially-read books; however, page count information is missing from LT for any book I read in galley form, or added well in advance of its publication date, so I figure it all evens out, pretty much.)

Author gender breakdown pie chart from LT (48.43% male, 51.57% female)

Female/male authors: Still almost exactly equal for my library overall, though the balance has tipped in favor of the ladies this year.

Five-star ratings: 20, including a few re-reads (Fangirl, From The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, I Capture the Castle, Station Eleven, Bossypants)

Here’s last year’s wrap-up, and here’s the one from 2013. And if you like reading other people’s recaps of their reading years, as I do, here’s Jessamyn West’s “Year in Reading” and Linda’s (ThreeGoodRats) “Year of Reading” and “TBR Pile Challenge 2016.”

I haven’t settled on any reading-related resolutions (say that three times fast), though I’m open to ideas. As usual, I’ll be trying to make my way through the books that I own but haven’t read yet; library books tend to jump the queue, since they have due dates.

Have you made a bookish resolution for the year? Do you have any recommendations? Are there books being published this year that you’re eager to read? I’m looking forward to Maggie Stiefvater’s final book in the Raven Cycle,  Jon Klassen’s next hat-related picture book, We Found A Hat, and I hear there will be a new Ann Patchett novel this year.

 

 

 

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Winter re-reading

When I was younger, I re-read books constantly. I re-read less now, partly because working in a public library, I’m hyper-aware of all the new books being published, as well as all the old ones that have a good long shelf life (pun intended). But I’m re-reading three* books right now, so I’ve been thinking: Which books do you return to over and over? Is there a particular time (say, when you’re traveling, or after finishing a very long book, or one you didn’t like much) or time of year that you like to re-read?

Cover image of Greenglass House*The three I’m re-reading/re-listening-to now are Greenglass House by Kate Milford; Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling, read by Jim Dale; The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman, read by a full cast. I read Greenglass House for the first time last year and I think re-reading it may become an annual winter tradition.

Here are a few of my other favorite books to re-read:

  • Cover image of The Golden CompassHis Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman (The Golden Compass is the first)
  • The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
  • The Magician’s Assistant by Ann Patchett
  • The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows
  • Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel
  • All My Friends Are Superheroes by Andrew Kaufman
  • Griffin & Sabine by Nick Bantock
  • The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
  • The Boggart by Susan Cooper
  • The View From Saturday by E.L. Konigsburg

I think I’ll re-read The Princess Bride this year also. I’ve been meaning to for a while…although I could re-read it every year for the next thirty years and still not catch up to how many times I’ve seen the movie.

 

 

 

And Little Louis: author-illustrator collaboration

Like most other picture book readers, I’m a big fan of Jon Klassen (I Want My Hat Back, This Is Not My Hat, etc.) and Mac Barnett (Sam and Dave Dig a Hole, Leo: A Ghost Story, etc.), so naturally when they collaborate I am excited. Their book Extra Yarn is a favorite, but I have been wondering about something.

I have been wondering about Little Louis.

littlelouis

Particularly, I am wondering if Mac Barnett handed (or more likely e-mailed) the manuscript to Jon Klassen and let him take it from there, or if they discussed how the illustrations and text would fit together. If it was the former, I wonder what Barnett had in mind for Little Louis, and how far that was from what Klassen came up with. Did it make him laugh? Or were they in on it together?

I used to work in publishing, but I don’t know much about picture book publishing, other than that some authors and illustrators work together more closely, others less closely. I asked Barnett and Klassen on Twitter but they haven’t replied. The question stands…

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Do you debut? Focus on first books

I only realized how few new debuts* I read when I was offered the chance to contribute to another Reader’s Shelf column in Library Journal,New Year, Nearly New Books: Favorite 2015 Debuts.” Looking back through nearly a year’s worth of reading, there weren’t very many for me to choose from, but I did really enjoy The Magician’s Lie by Greer Macallister. If you like magic and illusion, turn-of-the-century America, and (possibly) unreliable narrators, it would be a great book to curl up with this winter.

*”New debuts” isn’t redundant, I don’t think: an author’s first book is a debut whether it was published ten years ago or ten days ago. And if it was ten years ago, then hopefully there have been a few since, and you’ve got some catching up to do!

Do you seek out debuts? I don’t make a point of it, though I certainly don’t have anything against them – if it’s recommended to me or gets glowing reviews or has a great hook, I’m just as interested in a first novel as a tenth, and discovering a new writer is a pleasure. Really, the only downside to reading a new debut is that you’ll be waiting for the next one instead of diving into an author’s backlist.

Do you like to read everything an author has written, or do you read more selectively, even if you really like the author? Do you like to read an author’s work chronologically, reverse-chronologically, or does the order not matter to you?

Books on the radio

I was invited to be on Wisconsin Public Radio at the end of December to talk about audiobooks: why people might try them, how to find a book (or narrator) they like, when they might even be preferable to print books. Being on the radio was fun! It’s archived on WPR’s Central Time website (though I haven’t listened; I don’t want to hear how many times I said “um”). If you want to download or listen online, it’s from 5:30-6pm (unless you need to catch up on your local Wisconsin news and chit-chat, in which case, go ahead and listen to the whole thing).

I’ve written about audiobooks on this blog in the past; if you missed those posts, don’t worry, you can access them here, because the internet is forever: “I’d listen to her read a grocery list: on audiobooks” (3/12/14) and “Audiobook recommendations for a friend” (10/3/14). Or if you don’t want to click through, here’s the bullet point version:

  • How to get started if you’re new to audiobooks: Try listening to a book you’ve already read; choose a shorter book; listen to the first few minutes of a few different ones to see which narrator’s voice you like best.
  • Remember, taste is subjective: You might prefer a male or female narrator, a full cast production, American voices or other accents, slow or fast talkers.
  • How to get audiobooks: You can buy them, of course, but that gets expensive! Your local library probably offers audiobooks on CD and/or Playaways (a small device that contains one whole book), and may offer downloadable audiobooks as well through Overdrive, hoopla, or another platform. If you’re hearing impaired, you can get access to audiobooks for free in every state.
  • Value-added aspects: Some authors read their own books, which can be especially fun if they are familiar voices already, like Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Sarah Vowell, Neil Patrick Harris, or Aziz Ansari. Neil Gaiman and Jenny Lawson also read their own books, which I highly recommend.
  • A social experience: Before school vacations and holidays, lots of people come to the library looking for audiobooks the whole family can enjoy on long car trips. Finding a book everyone will enjoy can be a fun challenge depending on ages and tastes!
  • Seamless switching between formats: I haven’t done this myself, but one of the callers said she switched back and forth between the Kindle e-book and Audible audiobook; Amazon owns Audible so accounts can be synced for seamless transitions between audio and print.

Do you listen to audiobooks? Do you have a favorite genre to listen to, or a favorite narrator?