Step Into Storytime, April 12

Today I covered our Friday session of Step Into Storytime, which skews a little younger (more twos than threes) and a little smaller.

Spines of storytime books

  • Welcome and announcements (closed next Monday for Patriots Day)
  • “Hello friends” song with ASL
  • Name song (“____ is here today”)
  • The Rabbit Listened by Cori Doerrfeld: Kind of a quieter lead-off book that I might not have chosen if I’d known the book beforehand, but it worked okay.
  • “Kookaburra”: I thought I’d introduce a new (old, actually, 1932) song. I printed out the lyrics and put them up, along with a picture of a kookaburra (we didn’t have a kookaburra puppet, believe it or not), and also made small copies for the grown-ups.
  • Julian Is A Mermaid by Jessica Love
  • Yoga flow – and we sang “Head Shoulders Knees and Toes” while we were doing it, because I saw a kid put her hands on her head.
  • Want to Play Trucks? by Ann Stott: This simple little story shows kids playing together, solving problems, and ultimately agreeing about the main thing in life: WE LIKE ICE CREAM!
  • “Happy birthday” song and putting candles on flannel board cake. It didn’t look at all like I envisioned and that was perfect.
  • When’s My Birthday? by Julie Fogliano: This might not be a book you want to read over and over to your own kid, but it’s perfect for a group – you can put a ton of expression into it.
  • Yoga flow – using both sides of the body and the brain.
  • Monkey and Me by Emily Gravett: Probably one of my top five storytime books for this age group. It’s got a sing-song repetition AND animals. What more could you want?
  • “Kookaburra”: We sang it again (repetition helps learning), and I dropped in an early literacy tip (“If you’re wondering why we do so much singing in storytime, it’s because singing breaks words down into parts and introduces new words, all of which helps literacy development”). Plus I just love this song.
  • One Woolly Wombat by Rod Trinca and Kerry Argent: A counting, rhyming book full of Australian animals.
  • “Goodbye friends” song with ASL
  • Clean up mats
  • Color with crayons
  • Handout for grown-ups

Flannel board cake and candles

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Step Into Storytime, April 8

It’s a rainy day, so I looked for Christian Robinson’s book Rain, but it was out. I went with my original lineup, including some books about bugs and eggs hatching. Maybe because of the weather, we had a slightly smaller group today, about 12-13 kids.

Book covers

  • Welcome, announcements (no storytime next Monday because of Patriots’ Day)
  • “Hello Friends” song with ASL from Jbrary
  • Name song (“____ is here today”)
  • Interstellar Cinderella by Deborah Underwood, illustrated by Meg Hunt: This might’ve been too much of a reach for this group. The story is in rhyme, but it’s a little on the long side, or maybe there just isn’t the familiarity with the classic Cinderella tale yet, so it’s harder to enjoy variations. Some of the grown-ups liked it, though.
  • Song cube: “Where Is Thumbkin?” “ABCs”
  • We All Went On Safari by Laurie Krebs and Julia Cairns: Today we focused on the counting aspect of this book, but you could easily focus on animals instead.
  • Yoga flowBug puppets on chair
  • Bug puppets! We had a big basket of them in the closet, so I pulled them out and we looked at them one by one. One of them was even a caterpillar/butterfly, so the kids could see the transformation. We also had a ladybug, an ant, a spider, a fly, a monarch butterfly, a praying mantis, and a grasshopper. This was a perfect lead-in to…
  • Some Bugs: words by Angela DiTerlizzi, bugs by Brendan Wenzel. I love this book for storytime or one-on-one: it rhymes and moves quickly, and the illustrations are bright and interesting.
  • Song cube: “Itsy-Bitsy Spider,” “Row Row Row Your Boat”
  • Shake A Leg, Egg by Kurt Cyrus: One of my favorite springtime books, though maybe better one-on-one than in a group; the author/illustrator uses some really different perspectives, and there’s plenty of detail in the realistic illustrations. But I do love saying the first line (“Hello in there!”) like Miracle Max in The Princess Bride.
  • Speaking of eggs…time for shaker eggs and “Shake Your Sillies Out”!
  • Grumpy Pants by Claire Messer, with penguin puppet. Most of the kids came up to pet and hug the penguin, which helped its grumpy mood. There’s also counting (“One, two, three…SPLASH!”).
  • Yoga flow
  • There’s A Bear On My Chair by Ross Collins: Kids’ attention was starting to wander a little but the ending got a laugh from a couple grown-ups.
  • “Goodbye Friends” song with ASL from Jbrary
  • Clean up mats
  • Handout for grown-ups: Great books to share with two- and three-year-olds
  • Drawing with crayons on butcher paper on the floor

Next Monday we’re closed for Patriots’ Day, but I’m covering another Step Into Storytime this Friday and might debut a flannel cake and candles I just made to go with When’s My Birthday? Stay tuned!

Arlington Author Salon: Love in Tumultuous Times

The theme for tonight’s Arlington Author Salon, an event held quarterly at Kickstand Cafe in Arlington, was “Love in Tumultuous Times,” and the three featured authors were Whitney Scharer (The Age of Light), Jenna Blum (The Lost Family), and Christopher Castellani (Leading Men). The Arlington Author Salon is supported by the Arlington Cultural Council, which is in turn supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council. I’ve only been to two events so far, and both have been packed.

AgeofLightWhitney Scharer was up first, showing slides and then reading from her debut novel about Lee Miller, known as a model for Vogue and surrealist Man Ray’s muse, though she was a photographer in her own right, and co-inventor of the technique of solarization. (Aside: Every student should have a project like the one mentioned in Meg Wolitzer and Holly Goldberg Sloan’s new middle grade novel,  To Night Owl From Dogfish, “Give the right person the credit.”) Scharer discovered Miller at an exhibit featuring Man Ray at the Peabody Essex Museum in 2011, and was interested in the two of them “being in love and making art together.” (Miller went on to be a war reporter; she reminded me of Robert Capa’s partner, Gerda Taro, who was killed while documenting the Spanish Civil War.) Scharer read a scene from her novel in which Miller describes what she calls “wild mind”: her ability to set any expression on her face while modeling, yet thinking of anything she wants, setting her mind free. The scene (possibly the whole novel?) was in present tense.

LostFamilyNext, Jenna Blum (The Stormchasers, Those Who Save Us) talked about and read from her new novel, The Lost Family, set in New York and centered around a Holocaust survivor, Peter, who lost his wife and daughters. He now owns and runs a restaurant called Masha’s, after his late wife, and has sworn not to get involved with anyone again – but, of course, he does. The novel is about Peter and his second wife and their daughter, “a whole family trying to put its arms around a loved one’s PTSD.” Blum didn’t have slides, but she did share a cocktail of her own invention, and cream puffs called “Masha’s Little Clouds”; she said that she invented and kitchen-tested all the menu items in the book.

LeadingMenFinally, Christopher Castellani (A Kiss From Maddalena, The Saint of Lost Things, All This Talk of Love) talked about his newest novel, Leading Men, which imagines a party thrown by Truman Capote in Portofino in 1975, the guests, and the aftermath. Castellani said that people always want to know “how much is true and how much is not true,” so he explained that the party did happen, and that Tennessee Williams and his lover Frank Merlot really were invited, but that Williams’ journal does not mention the party in the days or weeks following it. Using both “real and invented people,” Castellani imagined and invented “between the cracks of what was known about these people.” Merlot is his main character; Williams isn’t a “point of view character” largely because he is too well-known, has written and been written about too much; Merlot, though not obscure, is less of a known quantity. Castellani admitted that it was daunting to write dialogue for characters like Capote and Williams; he would often use an “anchor quote” from their writings in order to get the tone of the dialogue and scene, and would sometimes remove the “scaffolding” once the scene was finished.

Though the book I’m currently reading (Famous Men Who Never Lived by K Chess, who, like these three authors, also has a Grub Street connection) is firmly speculative, I do love historical fiction and all three of these books are on my to-read list now. Thank you, Arlington Author Salon! (If you’re local, the next one is July 11.)

Step Into Storytime, April 1

Song cube, yoga cube, picture books

Happy April! Today was a super fun storytime. We had a great group of about 14 kids and their grown-ups, and I was excited for our activity/craft to go with A Parade of Elephants. Initially I was planning to read The Rabbit Listened, but ended up swapping it out for Z Is for Moose.

  • Welcome and announcements
  • “Hello friends” song with ASL from Jbrary
  • Hello Hello by Brendan Wenzel: I’m tempted to lead off with this book every time. It always elicits engagement from the kids and provides so many opportunities for moving and thinking.
  • Wolfie the Bunny by Amy Dyckman and Zachariah Ohora: This was a little long, but funny, and it doesn’t go where you think it’s going to go. The kids stuck with it (one of them took one look at the cover and observed, “That doesn’t look like a bunny!” Correct, kiddo.)
  • Yoga flow: mountain pose and forward fold, feet apart and gentle twist
  • I Am Josephine by Jan Thornhill and Jacqui Lee: In general I like to stick to books that have some kind of story (and forward momentum), but this one has questions and animals, which worked out pretty well. It’s also a good one-on-one book to discuss the different categories: living thing, animal, mammal, human being.
  • Song cube: “Itsy-bitsy Spider” and “Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes”
  • Goose Goes to the Zoo by Laura Wall: The last goose book until she writes a new one. The best part of this one was the page with all the honking: one kid yelled “It’s a car horn!” (It’s not. It’s geese.)
  • Yoga flow: tree/flamingo pose (there were flamingos in Goose Goes to the Zoo), Warrior 1 and 2
  • “ABC” song to get ready for…Z is for Moose (pages D and E)
  • Z Is for Moose by Kelly Bingham and Paul O. Zelinsky: If you’ve never read this aloud before, give it a few run-throughs first, to decide how you’re going to do the interruptions by Moose and Zebra. So funny, and a sweet ending.
  • Song cube: “I Had A Little Turtle”
  • Clean up mats
  • A Parade of Elephants by Kevin Henkes: We cleaned up the mats first because I wanted clear space for marching and parading. I also turned the flannel board around so everyone could see the flannel elephants, and lots of kids came up to touch them, take them off, and put them back on. Then we read the book and marched!
  • “Goodbye friends” song with ASL from Jbrary
  • Craft: using glue sticks to glue paper elephants and stars to butcher paper on the wall. I drew a path for them to use if they wanted but we ended up with beautiful chaos, of course. The kids spent a long time doing this – gluing is always a fun activity.

Kids gluing paper elephants and stars

 

Step Into Storytime, March 25

It was a beautiful day and a BIG group in our little storytime room today – about 18 kids plus a baby or two and accompanying grownups. It was a correspondingly loud storytime, so when possible, I used techniques to harness and direct the noise: CAW-ing like a crow in Harold and His Woolly Hat, HONK-ing with Goose Goes to School, lots of songs from the song cube.

Books arranged on the reading chair

  • Welcome and announcements
  • “Hello Friends” song with ASL from Jbrary
  • Harold Loves His Woolly Hat by Vern Kousky: I got a little brown bear out of our stuffed animal/puppet closet and let the kids pet it after the story. Hat tip to Lauren at the Robbins Library for reading Harold at her storytime a few months ago.
  • Yoga: forward fold to touch toes, stretch to touch ceiling
  • Goose Goes to School by Laura Wall: Again, Goose was a hit. I don’t know if it’s the bright colors or the text-to-illustration ratio or what, but it’s magic.
  • Song cube: Itsy-bitsy Spider, I Had A Little Turtle
  • Alfie Is Not Afraid by Patricia Carlin: Nearly all of the humor in this book comes from the juxtaposition between the pictures and the text, so I mentioned that upfront as something to look out for.
  • Yoga: Seated forward fold, stretch toward the ceiling, stretch to either side
  • When Spring Comes by Kevin Henkes: An informal poll shows that EVERYONE likes jumping in puddles.
  • “Shake Your Sillies Out” with shaker eggs (and scarves, because I ran out of eggs)
  • The Giant Jumperee by Julia Donaldson
  • Song cube: Zoom Zoom Zoom, We’re Going to the Moon; I’m A Little Teapot; Where Is Thumbkin?
  • Just Add Glitter by Angela DiTerlizzi and Samantha Cotterill: This has textured pages, which I let the kids feel after the story.
  • “Goodbye Friends” song with ASL from Jbrary
  • Clean up mats, get coloring sheets (I drew two different types of hat and made copies), color with crayons, come choose a colored pom pom and get a dot of glue.

Storytime live action shot - Goose Goes to School

Step into Storytime, March 18

I’ve missed two weeks of storytime – there was a snow day on March 4 and last week I was on vacation – and it felt like ages! It was good to be back today and see some familiar faces and some new ones. Today’s books were mostly on the shorter, simpler side, so we managed seven(!), as well as lots of songs and yoga.

song cube, yoga cube, picture books

  • Hello, welcome, announcements
  • “Hello Friends” song with ASL from Jbrary (skipped the name song because we had a big group – about 15)
  • Hello Hello by Brendan Wenzel: Still one of the best lead-off books I know of – so many opportunities for getting kids engaged (“Who’s wearing stripes? Who’s wearing spots? Can you wiggle like an octopus?”)
  • Yoga flow: resting pose, mountain pose, forward fold, tree
  • Goose by Laura Wall: This went over splendidly. It has the perfect amount of text on each page for this group, and the simple illustrations on brightly-colored backgrounds work really well for a group.
  • Song cube: “If you’re happy and you know it,” “I had a little turtle”
  • Shh! We Have A Plan by Chris Haughton: I’ve done Oh No, George! several times in storytime but this was the first time I did Shh! and it was excellent! There is “shh”ing of course, which keeps things quiet, but also counting, and also pointing (“Where’s the bird? Did they catch it?”), and it’s funny.
  • Yoga flow
  • Carrot and Pea by Morag Hood
  • One Little Blueberry by Tammi Salzano, illustrated by Kat Whelan
  • Song cube: “Itsy-bitsy Spider,” “I’m a little teapot,” “Zoom zoom zoom, we’re going to the moon”
  • Oh No, George! by Chris Haughton: We were running ahead of schedule and I had a little extra time, so I used this one from my pile of backup books. Always a favorite. What WILL George do?
  • My Spring Robin by Anne and Lizzy Rockwell
  • “Goodbye friends” song with ASL from Jbrary
  • Clean up mats
  • Coloring sheet: I traced the robin from the last page of My Spring Robin, enlarged it by 20%, and made copies for kids to color with crayons. (One kid didn’t want the robin so I gave him a leftover Wonky Donkey. Leftovers never go to waste!)

It really was good to be back. And here’s one more new resource I heard about through one of my book groups: Diverse BookFinder. If you’re looking for picture books featuring people of color or indigenous people of color, this is a tremendous resource, including books from 2002 to the present. The design is clean and clear and easy to navigate, and I’m looking forward to discovering new picture books using the Diverse BookFinder.